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opportunity to change the o'country. larry cohen on harry reiding filibuster cave. >>> women get overdue recognition to serve in combat. the right wing is freaking out. former marine goldie taylor is here to put them in their place. >>> thanks for watching. it's time to wake up, america. got to pay attention to this one. the republican attempt to steal the next presidential election, it has hit full throttle. this is the latest poster boy for republican vote rigging. virginia state senator bill carricko. now, today carrico advanced his bill in the republican-led senate to change the way electoral votes are counted in the state. virginia democratic state senator john s. edwards told me on my radio show that democrats were completely blindsided by this move. >> it was a complete underhanded sneak attack on not only democrats but also the people of virginia because if people had had no prior warning this would happen there, have been no committee discussions on this, no hearings on this, and it runs contrary to the courtesies and traditions of the senate of virginia. >> they should be no co
, and welcome to millionaire. with $40,000 and smiling from ear to ear is marisa cohen who knows that with that money, she can finally get her dream kitchen. something you've been wanting for a while, huh? >> yes. >> so tell me about that. >> well, i live in manhattan, so i have a typical small manhattan kitchen, and, you know, by the time you put the toaster oven and the microwave and my husband's teas and the peanut butter, there's this much room for me to cook. so i actually, at a recent silent auction, i won a consultation with an architect to, you know, redo our kitchen, but my husband, jeremy, said to me, "well, where are you gonna get the money to do it? go on millionaire." so-- >> is that how this happened? >> one of the ways. that and my children harassing me every time i yelled at the television. >> well, then we better get that kitchen for you. >> yeah, so... >> no question about it. so let's recap where you are. okay, you're still taking on round 1. so far, you have banked $40,000. >> whew, yay. >> you're 10 away from the million. you have one lifeline remaining. >> o
medalist, sacha cohen. first this is "today" on nbc. >> announcer: "today" at the rink is brought to you by smucker's. with a name like smuckers, it has to be good. >> this morning on "today" at the rink, silver silver medalist sasha cohen joins us and will skate for us. good morning to you. >> good morning. it's freezing. >> it is. you should be used to that as a skater. >> this is a little bit below that. >> you've been busy since then, skating and other things. >> i'm attending columbia university, launched my own line of skates. promoting at nationals this weekend. and just busy. >> u.s. championships are this weekend. you are a former u.s. champion. anybody you have your eye on? >> ashley wagner is a strong favorite. she trained with my old coach and i'll definitely be rooting for her this weekend. >> tell me about this special, ba barry manilow is the inspiration? >> yes. never had such fun skating to a live artist. don't miss it. it's great. >> training for the olympics, but obviously this is something very important to you. >> i've been skating every day for years, which i love.
a public health emergency. elizabeth cohen joins us now. what do health officials mean when they use the word epidemic? >> it gets very technical. i'll boil it down here. basically, people are getting sick and dying from the flu in certain numbers. when those numbers get high enough, we call it an epidemic. i personally don't really care that much about that word. i'll tell you why. the flu season nearly always reaches epidemic levels. even if it's just like a moderate plain old, you know, normal season. so i think we shouldn't get focused too much on that word. we instead should focus on what we're seeing here which is what can you do to avoid getting the flu which is getting a flu shot and doing things like washing your hands and staying away from people who look sick. john? >> it doesn't feel like just a normal flu season here. i have to tell you. a lot of people sick here in the office. a lot of people sick where i live. governor cuomo declared a public health emergency. so since we're talking about terminology, what does that mean? >> let me go back to what you said before. this
-public information with his boss, the billionaire hedge fund manager steve cohen of sac capital. martoma's big tip allegedly taking place during a 20-minute phone call to cohen the day before the news of the drug failing a key trial became public. sac sold its position before that public announcement netting the firm a profit and avoiding losses totaling $276 million. sac declined comment on today's arraignment and they claim they acted appropriately and are cooperating with the government. martoma is the fifth sac employee to be charged with securities fraud while working at the hedge fund. one other has been named as a co-conspirator. martoma also seemed critical to securing what many believe is the government's ultimate catch, mr. cohen. because of the phone call that he made to mr. cohen in july of 2008. unlike three other former sac employees though, he has refused to cooperate or strike a deal maintaining all the while that he is innocent. now today's arraignment should be quick. basically mr. martoma will enter his plea and then possibly the judge will likely set a schedule for discovery or
about any measure, steve cohen is a financial superstar, amazing success at picking stocks has made him one of the richest, most powerful stars on wall street. now his reputation and his empire may be in jeopardy. a federal criminal investigation appears to have him in the crosshairs. whenever the stock market is open, you usually can find steve cohen here, at the center of the football field-sized trading floor in connecticut, home to his hedge fund. for almost two decades, he has wracked up 20% to 30% annual return for his investors, losing money only one year, leading one magazine to dub him the most brilliant hedge fund manager alive. >> he is viewed as one of the top, top traders that has ever, ever worked on wall street. >> reporter: and does he live large, worth about $9 billion, he owns this lavish estate with a 36,000-square hp foot house and holes for golf. his art collection is valued at almost $1 billion, with works by van gogh and andy warhol. >> the edge he has gotten is not just from his own insight but perhaps from other means that are not legal. >> reporter: so far, fed
. >> the hospital says the health and safety of the patients is the top priority. elizabeth cohen is our senior medical correspondent. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> this nurse she treats some of the sickest patients and if they get the flu there could be some serious health consequences. >> right, if you or i get the flu it's unpleasant, we're out of work for a couple of days or maybe a week, we don't feel well but we're probably not going to die but when someone is that sick in the hospital or in a hospice, if they get the flu, they could die and in fact 36,000 people a year die from the flu, so it's a serious thing for these patients. >> so this hospital has this mandatory policy. is this becoming more common? >> it is becoming more common because the only protection really for these very sick patients, of course they get the flu shot themselves, but it's so surround them with people who have also been vaccinated, so before around 2005 hospitals didn't really care so much, they didn't really push this, but then they started to push it and look at these numbers. it really tells you s
working with the police agencies on the site. his name is aaron cohen. give us a minute while we work out our technical difficulty. i want to get to trace cgallaghr who will give us a look at the scene. >> i want to go back to the graphic you had up there the inside of the bunker cha they believe to be the inside bunker. how much food days he have in there? we talked about the fact that they are communicating sending medicine into the pvc pipe. how long can they remain in there? is there adequate water and food. one of the key questions in this entire case is what is the mental capacity now of the man who is holding this 5-year-old boy hostage and is he near the breaking point? he is still communicating and experts say that's a good sign that he is still communicating and talking when communications breakdown is when things go south and experts really start to worry. clearly they are worried now. one of the big concerns is making sure they keep the conversation going and figuring out exactly how sustainable that bunker is for this 5-year-old boy. >> he was a former israeli counter terrori
columnist william cohen is here with reaction. we'll break it down. stay with us. she keeps you guessing. it's part of what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or if you have any allergic reactions such as rash, hives, swelling of the lips, tongue o
's check in with dr. ron cohen, the founder and ceo of acorda therapeutics. welcome back to "mad money." >> thanks very much, jim. >> i was going back to our interview in july of last year, and so much has changed. at the time you were only talking about pre-clinical or rat studies of what your drug could be for stroke. since then, i was looking at your presentation this morning -- this week. 66 people with stroke, at least six months trying this. give me the progression. there have got to be people initially happy with the post stroke deficit study. >> well, it's still a blinded study, jim. that means we have no idea who's done well on placebo versus drug, but we're going to find out pretty soon. we're getting the results of that trial in the second quarter of this year. we're very excited to see those results. >> i think people want to understand, it's not just everybody who has had a stroke. it's a particular kind of people who face a stroke problem, right? >> yeah, well, about half the people who have had a stroke wind up with permanent disabilities. as a result, reduced mobility,
. it seems unbelievable. if it seems such, it just may be. elizabeth cohen joins me live to answer to this miracle. you know, i thought this might be a first-time thing. but it's happened a few times before. double arm transplants. how do they do it? it seems so intricate. >> they have to reconnect everything. you can imagine, this is surgery done at times with a microstop. you're reconnecting -- microscope. you're reconnecting every muscle, every tendon, every nerve. and you're connecting blood vessels. if that limb doesn't get blood, that limb will die. i was just on the phone with a surgeon who's done these before. he said that is the part that really makes you sweat is when you have to put that circulatory system back together. so okay oh is the seventh person -- marrocco is the seventh person to have this double arm transplant. the surgeon told me the biggest part of success is what part of the arm the transplant is done. the closer to the wrist the better. in simple terms, the more of the arm you have to transplant, the more difficult the task is. and brendan's actually, it's
is a lot safer. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins me now to explain. what are we talking about in terms of rules? you think they should be there, wouldn't you? >> you would think they definitely should have already been there and safety advocates have been begging for these for years and thrilled the fda doing the basic things. better measures to keep animals out of fields where crops are growing because what they do in fields? poop in fields. we don't want that. better rules to get farm workers to wash their hands and the last one, little gross but i have to say it. okay? got to say it. which is, port-a-potties for the work earls because when they don't have them, what do they do? >> come on. no way, elizabeth. that's not already a regulation? >> no, no. there aren't strict rules like the rules doing here. again, you can see why safety advocates so frustrated because some of the things are so basic. and they're hoping these will be fully implemented. we have done the segments, peanuts, spinach. they seem to go on and on. >> in fact, i was going to bring that up.
. senators are santa clara santa clara senior tim scott and massachusetts senator lynn cohen. what are your favorite tweets today? follow me on app greta wire. coming up. have you gotten your food order messed up before? [ engine revving ] ♪ [ male announcer ] every car we build must make adrenaline pump and pulses quicken. ♪ to help you not just to stay alive... but feel alive. the new c class is no exception. it's a mercedes-benz through and through. see your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for exceptional offers through mercedes-benz financial services. for exceptional offers time can ofbe...well...taxing. so right now we'll give you... ...$10 off any turbo tax deluxe level software or higher! find thousands of big deals now... officemax. and you learned something along the way. this is the age of knowing what you're made of. so, why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. 20 million men already have. ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in bloo
clara senior tim scott and massachusetts senator lynn cohen. what are your favorite tweets today? follow me on app greta wire. coming up. have you gotten your food order messed up before? the secret to drive-thru success is next. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. for their annual football trip. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their ddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. but with the capital one ven
james brolinen plays a police sergeant who leads a group determined to bring down mickey cohen. >> after the aurora movie theater shootings last summer, the director scrapped a scene that depicted a shooting spree inside a theater. movie reviewer kevin mccarthy talked to josh brolin about the decision and how the cast reacted to shooting a new scene to replace it. >> you have to go back and actually reshoot a sequence, where is an actor of keeping the art form and story or having to do something because it is offensive. >> the decision comes from warner brothers. i think it was a very smart decision that they made because, you know, not even to bring so much attention. i don't like the idea of bringing more attention to what the guy did because of creating this iconic character whether it be columbine and ending up to time magazine and all that and doing that with this guy but also the similarities were so creepy, it was so kind of -- i've never quite seen anything like it that you just couldn't do it. i supported the decision fully and i like the new scene better. >> i love the line abo
that's called simply "lost." >> look for the light which comes from leonard cohen's wonderful piece "anthem." it talks about in every door there's a crack of light. from this dark loss we can look into the light and find the future. >> reporter: and for one artist, this debate is not for or against. >> i was brought up using guns. >> reporter: brian comes from a family of hunters in central pennsylvania. >> i think we need to think about what is proper use and improper use. >> reporter: american art has often been vocal and radical, and krauss says a call to arms is supposed to be openly political, to motivate public opinion, stir the debate. a constitutional conversation arguing about the second amendment with the freedoms of the first, and no one gets muffled. >> the exhibit is free, and the art is for sale. most of the proceeds will go towards groups pushing for kbun control. you can find details on just search newtown project. >>> and the "today" show is up next here on nbc 4. let's find out what they're working on. >> lester holt, no longer in d.c., joins us
widespread this epidemic has become? we're going to talk with elizabeth cohen at the top of the hour. would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. >>> our starting point one month later, we're live this morning from newtown, connecticut, marking one month since 20 first graders and 6 staffers were gunned down inside the sandy hook elementary school. this morning we take a look at how the community is coping today and their plans to help prevent another tragedy. >>> then a flu especialpidemic widespread across 47 states with vaccines running low. where we stand and what you need to know to protect you and your family. >>> plus hollywood celebrates its own at the golden globe awards. we've got the surprises and the
activity. the yellow states have local activity. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now. this has been a bad season. i call it the whoop, when i hear that cough, i go you got the whoop. >> and you get away as quuckly as possible. >> you smile and back out of the room. >> how bad has the flu season been? >> it's been one of the worst flu seasons in the past decade, maybe only two or three has been as bad as this year. flu can hit early, like in november, december, which is what happened this year, or it can hit later, like january, february, or even later like march and so this has been a really early flu season. not a terrible flu season, but an early flu season. >> now, because it's so early, does that give us any indication how bad it will get? >> i was talking to folks at the cdc last night, and they said, look, we think it will be a moderate to severe season overall. so, worse than last year but not as bad as some other years. >> when i hear that whoop somewhere in this building -- >> i heard it many times in this building. >> i think i didn't get a flu shot. is
: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? mr. cohen: to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman ask for unanimous consent? mr. cohen: i do indeed. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for one minute. mr. cohen: thank you, mr. speaker. we've heard from a colleague of mine on the democratic side who sounds like he's not going to vote for this provision and we heard from a couple folks from the other side. i'm going to vote for it, not because i think it's all the best, sugar and spice and everything nights, but because for one thing, i believe our president and our vice president know what they can get in a negotiated deal with the republican side in the senate and what might pass this house as well. and they know what our country needs. and my district can't afford to wait a few days and have the stock market go down 300 points tomorrow if we don't get together and do something and people in my district need unemployment compensation and they need to know in the future
-old boy is wondering how this common treatable virus could take the life of their son. elabeth cohen is joining us. she spent the morning with the family. elizabeth, how did this happen? >> reporter: wolf, it was such an emotional morning. i'm in front of the church that the family attends. mack was 17. that personified who he was. as you said, perfectly healthy. on december 21st he started feeling sick, a headache, a little bit tired. he had a fever but really no big deal and he was better in about two days and he then he felt fine for a while. and then a couple days later he started feeling bad again. his parents took him to a local hospital in the rural area they were in and they said he's got the flu and his kidneys are failing. they said, we have to get him to a bigger hospital. they put him on a helicopter and this is what max said to his mother as he was getting on the helicopter. >> one of the last coherent things he said, he looked at me and tears were rolling down his face. >> he was scared. >> he said, mom, i'm scared. i said, i know, buddy. i am, too. he said, mom, it's g
. >> we've got another show? >> we have a good show. >> who's on it? >> i have no idea. andy cohen, celebrity buzz. >> watch what's happening live. >> yes. he was buzzed last night apparently with hoda. >> wait a minute. i thought it was dry month. >> it's dry month here. >> you can go out and drink? >> i think you can go out and drink. >> it was dry month when you said yes to fill in on "today"? >> i'm on the cleanse. so i'm really dry. >> great. >> it's going to be very good. it's going to be a good show. >> fantastic. >> a little kindness. >> to hear more about meredith's cleanse, join us for our fourth hour of the "today" show in just a little while. >> you need a cleanse. >> you need a cleanse, all right. >> meanwhile, mr. roker has a check of the weather. >> all right. let's see what we've got for you. starting off for today, snow showers. a real mess in the northwest. making its way in. air stagnation alerts. our computer is stuck. come on, babe! come on. there you go. lake-effect snow showers around the great lakes. it's going to be a big problem as we move into tomorrow an
life. >> reporter: elizabeth cohen, cnn, ft. worth, texas. >> thanks for watching, everyone. "cnn newsroom" continues now with martin savidge. you can pick it up from here. >> thanks very much. >> sure. >>> 12:00 p.m. on the east coast, 9:00 a.m. on the west coast. i'm martin savidge in for fredricka whitfield. if you are just tuning in, thank you very much for joining us. these are the top stories we're following right now in the "cnn newsroom." it could be one of the most shocking admissions in sports history. "usa today" is reporting that lance armstrong will admit to doping in an upcoming interview with oprah. we're following that story. >> i said it for seven years. i've said it for longer than seven years. i have never doped. i can say it again. but i've said it for seven years. it doesn't help. >> reporter: help may be something lance armstrong will need a lot of to redeem his reputation after "usa today" reports armstrong will admit to doping throughout his career. the newspaper does not name their source but says it's a person with knowledge of the situation. "usa today"
, as richard cohen notes in "the washington post" nothing hagel has said about israel is not said in the israeli press on a daily basis. trust me, by the "wall street journal" standards israeli media would be deeply anti-semitic. lost perhaps in the discussion over hagel's position on israel is one of the main reasons he was nominated in the first place. >> most importantly, chuck knows that war is not an abstraction. he knows that sending young americans to fight and bleed in the dirt and mud, that's something we only do when it's absolutely necessary. >> a decorated war veteran reportedly requested to be sent to vietnam. hagel spoke to the library of congress in 2002 about how his military service had informed his world view. >> someone needs to represent that perspective in our government as well. the people in washington make the policy, but it's the little guys who come back in the body bag. >> as president obama attempts to put his next cabinet together, republicans seem to have developed an acute case of goldilocks syndrome. susan rice was too much of a loyalist, and republ
or hanging out with andy cohen, sometimes thing on thing that helps is a little hair of the dog. thank you for watching. "erin burnett outfront" starts right now. >>> the pentagon makes a bombshell announcement about women fighters. and apple shares plummet after hours. and, wow, it's cold out there. so let's talk about global warming. and hillary clinton gets heated. the man on the other end is our guest. guest. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, showdown over benghazi. secretary of state hillary clinton was on capitol hill today. she faced really tough questions from the senate and the house about the september 11th terror attack in libya that killed the united states ambassador and three other americans. >> we were misled that there were supposedly protests and something sprang out of that and that was easily ascertained that was not the fact and the american people could have known that within days. and they didn't know that. >> with all due respect, the fact is, we had four dead americans, was it
the playing field? >> for us it's always about what's in folks' hearts. we have cohen who gets an a on our report card, and we have a new senator like tim scott who is black gets an f every year. when i look at senator scott, i'm very glad that going into the 150th celebration, if you will. of the eman pags prok clags we have one black senator. we should have at least 10. when i look at him, you know, i say quite frankly what wuch my old coaches said about me in a sport i wasn't so good aat. he has nothing but potential. there's nothing but room to improve. we would hope that he would not continue to get fs on the naacp report card? >> is that because he's a republican or what's behind it? >> no. we have republicans that believe in civil rights. unfortunately, he's not one of them, and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rhinos as they call them, these republican whoe believe in civil rights again and again. so, you know, for instance, you take senator specter there recently. he was very good on the same sorts of justice issues i was talking about. you know,
. arizona put the most restrictions into effect, seven, and elizabeth cohen went back to texas where roe vs. wade, well, the decision began. we'll learn more about the decision fight today. >> reporter: roe vs. wade originated in texas and 40 years later the situation here and in much of the u.s. is complex. on the one hand, the governor has made this vow -- >> my goal and the goal of many of those joining me here today is to make abortion at any stage a thing of the past. >> reporter: on the other hand, this is the reality -- hi, it's elizabeth at cnn. >> great. come on in, ma'am. i'm at the whole woman's health clinic austin where seven women will have abortions today. >> any more ultrasounds? >> i don't think we have any more. >> rorter: amy started whole women's health ten years ago, and her business has grown. she has five clinics in texas, offering gynecology care that includes providing abortions to 9,000 women a year. >> my main goal is provide an oasis for her where she feels safe, comfortable, at peace. >> reporter: the entire state 27,470 women received abortions in 2011. in the
identify whether or not they have this thing. elizabeth cohen in atlanta. why is this one so nasty this time around, elizabeth? >> soledad, it is the perfect storm for this particular stomach bug. so let's go over the three things that make this one really bad. first of all this particular strain, so new, it's called the sydney 2012. first spotted in sydney just last year, we're not immune to it. our bodies haven't seen it before. it comes on full force. highly contagious. just need one or two particles of this virus to get you sick. and a lot of people get this illness, they are contagious, but symptom free. they are not sick. running around making the rest of us sick. >> so disgusting. you know how i feel about those people. elizabeth cohen, thank you. listen, she and i agree on the purell thing. >>> the southeast getting a dose of the deep freeze with snow, freezing rain and dangerous ice expected from the carolinas to tennessee. even farther south. drivers in nashville, told don't travel if you don't have to. out west, the rare sight of freezing rain forced the runways at salt
prohibited abortions except to save the mother's life. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen returned to the state where it all began and spoke to both sides. >> reporter: roe v. wade originated in texas and 40 years later the situation here and in much of the u.s. is complex. on the one hand the governor has made this vow. >> my goal and the goal of many of those joining me here today is to make abortion at any stage a thing of the past. >> reporter: on the other hand, this is the reality. it's elizabeth at cnn. >> come on in. >> reporter: i'm at a health clinic in austin where seven women will have abortions today. >> do we have anymore all t ultrasounds? >> i don't think so. >> reporter: she offers a care that includes providing abortions to 9,000 women a year. >> my main goal is to provide an oasis where she feels safe and at peace. >> reporter: 72,470 women received abortions in 2011. in the u.s., nearly one in three women will have an abortion before the age of 45 according to the nonpartisan guttmacher institute. you have a lot more work to do? >> we have a lot more work to do
virus that has some awful symptoms. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen is here with us. what is this sydney 2012? >> sydney 2012 is a strain of something called norovirus, which a lot of people call smum fl stomach flu, not the right terminology, but icky for want of a better phrase. we're talking about forceful vomiting. we're talking diarrhea. it is really not pleasant. >> yeah. something you don't want to go to work with. nobody wants this. how do we stop this from coming into our bodys? >> you know, to some extent you can't. it is incredibly contagious. if you're sick now and god forbid you were vomiting, i would be in real trouble. wash your hands a lot with soap and water. you can use an alcohol-based sterilizer but you should be doing soap and water. wash down surfaces and remember that even after you're better, you can still be contagious. and so don't cook for other people for a little while, or if you do, be really careful. >> this is what i find fascinating. i could have it and give it to other people and not even know it. >> exactly. some people have this virus, b
of beverly hills talked about staking her dog jiggy to andy cohen's show "watch what happens live." >> jiggy was slurping from -- ice cube from a vodka tonic. >> andy cohen is a bad influence. >> jiggy was so jilled, he would fall asleep. >> he looks little hung over. >> jiggy is more of a social drinker whereas cleo drank for medicinal purposes. sometimes the only thing that helps is a little hair of the dog. thanks for watching. that does it for us. "early start" begins now. >>> america on ice. from the midwest to mid-atlantic, subzero cold causes misery and takes more li lives. >>> the right to fight. for the first time the pentagon will allow women in combat on the front lines. >> that's huge news. >>> a defiant north korea threatening more nuclear tests and calling the u.s. its sworn enemy. that breaking overnight. good morning, everyone. welcome to "early start," i'm john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. thursday, january 24th, 5:00 a.m. in the east. let's get started here. up first if you are still wrapped up in your blankets you may want to stay right where you are. >> do not mov
cohen joins us live from atlanta. all of the talk this morning. what are exactly the dangers of these drugs? >> let's talk about where these drugs come from and why people use them. let's start with human growth hormone, mentioned in the story. human growth hormone is something we all naturally have. made basically in our pituitary glands. what it can do, it can reduce fat and increase muscle mass. but some of the dangers are it can cause bone and muscle pain, diabetes and heart diseasor increase the chance you will get those. let's talk about testosterone, also mentioned in the story. testosterone, a hormone both men and women have. and some people say if you take it, you get bigger, leaner, stronger, and when you have a big workout, it enhances your recovery. makes it easier to recover. but here are some of the dangers. it can increase the chances of getting all sorts of things from sleep apnea to heart disease if a man already has prostate cancer, may grow that existing prostate cancer. >> like lance armstrong's case. is it illegal for doctors to give these drugs to athlet
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)